title

Custom Search

 

[ Correct English | Common Errors | Words Differentiation | Sample Letters | Glossary of Correct Usage | Common Sentences | Q & A ]

[ English Compositions | Movie Reviews | High School Vocab | Advertisements ]

Sponsored Links

<<Prev

High  School  English  essays

Next>>

   
TOEFL Vocabulary
English Conversation
English Grammar
American Idioms
English Comprehension
English Summary
English News
Business Idioms
 

Man's mastery over nature

 

The modern scientific revolution has certainly enabled man to make enormous strides in harnessing Nature's power and potential for his own purposes. Yet, e should be careful not to assume too easily that final and complete control is only a matter of time.

Before the days of freedom of though and research, progress was held up by ignorance and superstition. Early cosmologies pronounced the earth flat, the fixed center of the universe. Being flat, it therefore had edges, precipices in fact, so, wide travel and exploration was discouraged, and none by the most intrepid would venture far. Religion especially Judaism and the mediaeval Christianity rooted in Jewish concepts, taught this cosmology as a religious fact and banned all scientific research based on independent thought. It was believed that the world was God's -- in the sense that he discouraged interference and undue investigation, all knowledge necessary to man's salvation being contained in the Bible. Knowledge, therefore, belonged to the Church. Men died at the stake to contest this assertion. But it was the Renaissance which set thought free. Galileo pronounced the earth round. the door was open, and science struggled free from religion. Thus, the beginning of man's conquest of nature came about, and it was not until the 20th century, well after the Darwinian theory of evolution has been fully accepted, that science and religion came to terms, that the enlightened began to realize it was a case of 'both and' rather than 'either or.'

But whatever knowledge was groped after the Renaissance, such knowledge had virtually no practical application, until the 18th century in Britain, which marked the beginning of the scientific revolution. This was because there was virtually no such thing as systematic scientific research. From times up to Watt's steam engine, applied science was almost non-existent. But from 1733 onwards to the present day, discovery has followed discovery with fantastic speed; the steam engine -- hence industrial machines, 'horseless carriages,' and railways -- now of course petrol jet, atomic and nuclear power; electricity with its manifold applications; radio, telegraphy, radar, television; rocket propulsion and therefore space probes; lighter metals resulting in freedom to use them for aircraft; plastics, with their thousand one uses; man-made fibers and a host of others. And apart from these dramatic discoveries, great advances have been made in medical science, in public health and in crop growing -- to mention but a few.

The more man probes nature's laws, the more he seems to control nature. Today, he an extract precious metals from ore -- he can even transmute them; he can move earth and forests and rapidly lay roads, construct airfields and parts, build new cities. He can defend himself by using modern weapons, guns, bombs or missiles. He can ride the earth's surface by car, rail, bicycle and ship; he can search the sea's bottom by using diving gear, or sail beneath the surface for months on end in submarines. He can fly over it in jet aircraft high over the earth's atmosphere. He can photograph the moon from a few kilometers range and transmit the pictures instantaneously to earth. We have seen him land on the moon. He can move and till the earth with giant machines. He can defeat disease by antibiotics and prolong his life by observing scientific health-rules. He can use natural products as never before; timber for his daily newsprint; coal and oil for his machines; waterfalls for his hydro-electric plant; steel and concrete for his buildings; nuclear power to produce his electricity.

There seems to be no end to it all, and it is easy to assume that man will soon master the world and eventually the universe. This, on reflection, seems to be a fallacy, for what man is really doing is discovering and applying the forces of nature -- not inventing them, and in his applications, merely scratching the surface. Science may probe space, but it cannot defeat the laws of time and motion. there is no foreseeable way tin which man could ever venture beyond Mars; Medicine had advanced, but we still suffer from the common cold. The psychiatrist can diagnose a psychopath, but cannot cure him. The technologist can make a robot or a computer, but cannot begin to understand the human brain.

It seems the giant intelligence we call God has said 'thus far and no further'. And the facts of man's moral nature give no cause for optimism. The truth seems to be that man has not and never will master nature. It is nature which gently tolerates man.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
 
 

 

451    452    453    454    455    456    457    458    459    460    461    462    463    464    465    466    467    468    469    470    471    472    473    474    475    476    477    478    479    480    481    482    483    484    485    486    487    488    489    490    491    492    493    494    495    496    497    498    499    500    501    502    503    504    505    506    507    508    509    510    511    512    513    514    515    516    517    518    519    520    521    522    523    524    525    526    527    528    529    530    531    532    533    534    535    536    537    538    539    540    541    542    543    544    545    546    547    548    549    550    551    552    553    554    555    556    557    558    559    560    561    562    563    564    565    566    567    568    569    570    571    572    573    574    575    576    577    578    579    580    581    582    583    584    585    586    587    588    589    590    591    592    593    594    595    596    597    598    599    600    601    602    603    604    605    606    607    608    609    610    611    612    613    614    615    616    617    618    619    620    621    622    623    624    625    626    627    628    629    630    631    632    633    634    635    636    637    638    639    640    641    642    643    644    645    646    647    648    649    650    651    652    653    654    655    656    657    658    659    660    661    662    663

High School English essays 1

 
Sponsored Links
 
 
American Slang
English Proverbs
English Exercises
Common English mistakes
Ancient Chinese stories
Junior English essays
High School English essays
Lower Secondary English essays