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No one's ability to remember names is perfect. Yet this important skill gives you the advantage in business and personal relations. In my research, I have found that memory lapses often boil down to a question of concentration. Each day our brains are bombarded with information that is evaluated in a complex sorting system. Generally, we store important information in a long-term memory and hold less meaningful data in short-term memory. What is the art of remembering names then ?

Firstly keep focused. When you find yourself wrestling with a forgotten name ten seconds after an introduction, it's because you were inattentive. This happens primarily because we often are preoccupied with ourselves. once I was to address a group of memory scholars. On the way to the conference center, I noticed my socks didn't match. I was a little annoyed but I didn't do anything about it. When faced with the group of scholars, all I could think about was my socks. My speech got off to an awkward start, and I had to struggle to remember what I wanted to say. Remember, when you're meeting someone new, clear your thoughts of outside concerns. If you mind wanders during an introduction, ask that the name be repeated.

To reinforce your memory, dramatise faces. If you try to memorise names by rote, you'll probably forget the information quickly. But if you dramatise names and faces with memorable images, you'll most likely recall them with ease. The best way to retain new names is by 'association-exaggerating' or forging connections between unlike things. Here's how: After you've been told a person's name, focus on his face. Is there something particularly interesting or attractive about it ? Is the hair bright red? Are the eyebrows heavy? are the eyes striking ? select just one feature and commit it to memory by exaggerating or animating it.

You could also make associations. Once you've memorised a particular feature, transform the person's name into an unforgettable image through rudimentary and even amusing connections. Easy associations work best. You may select a word that sounds like the name. After you've found a dramatic image for a name, place it over the distinct feature of the person's face. if you can make the images interactive, then you will increase recall.

The final key is to remember a person's name in review. During your conversation, say the name as often as seems appropriate. For example, "That's an interesting point, Mike !" At the end of your conversation, repeat the name out loud. For example, "I'm glad we had a chance to meet, Mike." After wards, you may want to write down a person's name and the imagery you have connected with it.

Training yourself to remember names may take a lot of practice. But once you've mastered the art, you can be sure people will remember you.

From paragraph 1 :
  1.

(a) Why is it important to remember names ?

(b) What is the main cause of memory lapses ?

   

From paragraph 2 :

  2.

(a) What did the writer mean when he said "... my socks didn't match" ?

(b) What effect did it have on him when he was giving a speech.

    From paragraph 3 :
  3.

(a) In the sentence 'To reinforce your memory, dramatise faces', what does the word 'reinforce' mean ?

(b) Why shouldn't one memorise names by rote ?

    From paragraph 3 :
  4.

Explain how one dramatises faces or names to reinforce their memory.

    From paragraph 4 and 5 :
  5.

Give an example how one can

(a) 'make easy associations' to remember names.

(b) remember names better during a conversation.

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Answers
 

1.

(a) It gives one the advantage in business and personal relations.

(b) The lack of concentration causes memory lapses.

 

2.

(a) His socks that he wore were of different pattern or color.

(b) He was too preoccupied with the socks that he could not concentrate on his speech.

 

3.

(a) It means 'enhance' or 'improve'.

(b) Memorising names by rote may result in forgetting them.

 

4.

(a) One dramatises faces or names by forging connections between the name and some distinctive feature of the person's face, and then commit it to memory by exaggerating or animating it.

 

5.

(a) One can select a word that sounds like the name and relate it to a distinctive feature of the person concerned.

(b) Say the name as often as seems appropriate.

 
 
 
 
 

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Comprehension 1

 

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