title

Custom Search

 

[ Correct English | Common Errors | Words Differentiation | Sample Letters | Glossary of Correct Usage | Common Sentences | Q & A ]

[ English Compositions | Movie Reviews | High School Vocab | Advertisements ]

Sponsored Links

<<Prev

Comprehension

Next>>

   
TOEFL Vocabulary
English Conversation
English Grammar
American Idioms
English Comprehension
English Summary
English News
Business Idioms
 
My Brilliant Brain

Geniuses amaze us, impress us, and make us all a little jealous. How do they differ from the average person? Scientists are working hard to figure out that answer. Tune in to the National Geographic Channel to find out about the discoveries they're making in the series My Brilliant Brain.

When Marc Yu was only two years old, he began to play the piano. After a year, he started learning pieces by Beethoven. Now he's a world-renowned concert pianist at age eight. He learns newer and more difficult pieces with ease and can identify any note he hears. He seems to be specially designed for music. In Born Genius, National Geographic looks at the science behind child prodigies to explain why some children seem to be born without limits.

Genius didn't come naturally to Tommy McHugh. His came only after he nearly died from bleeding in his brain. After recovering, McHugh's head was filled with new thoughts and pictures. So, he began to express them in the form of poetry and art. Now, he's a seemingly unstoppable creative machine. Sufferers of autism and brain injury have shown that great mental ability can sometimes come from damage or disease. Accidental Genius explores this puzzling relationship.

Can normal people be trained to be geniuses? Susan Polger has shown no signs of extraordinary intelligence. Yet, during her childhood, she studied thousands of chess patterns and learned to recognize them immediately. As a result, she was able to beat skilled adult players by age 10 and can now play up to five games at the same time without even seeing the boards. Make Me a Genius examines what it takes to turn an ordinary brain into that of a genius.

If becoming a genius were easy, we'd all be one. Yet, there is much more to super intelligence than simply being born lucky. Learn more about amazing brains this month on National Geographic's My Brilliant Brain.

     
  1.

What is the main idea of the article?

       
    (A) There's no such thing as a true genius.
    (B) People can only be born as geniuses.
    (C) Scientists completely understand the brain.
    (D)

There are many factors in being a genius.

       
  2.

An example of a child prodigy is _____.

       
    (A)

a person who can do complex math at a young age

    (B) a kid who works really hard to do well in school
    (C) a student who practices an instrument a lot
    (D) a child who is eager to learn new things
       
  3.

Which of the following is NOT true according to the article?

       
    (A)

People are usually smarter when they recover from brain injury.

    (B) New things about the brain are still being discovered.
    (C) Some people naturally have more active brains.
    (D) People without natural abilities can learn to do things very well.
       
  4. What would be the best way to describe Susan Polger's special abilities?
       
    (A) Native
    (B) Standard
    (C)

Developed

    (D) Restricted
           
Sponsored Links
 
  Answers : 1) D    2) A    3) A    4) C
 
 
 
 
 

301    302    303    304    305    306    307    308    309    310    311    312    313    314    315    316    317    318    319    320    321    322    323    324    325    326    327    328    329    330    331    332    333    334    335    336    337    338    339    340    341    342    343    344    345    346    347    348    349    350    351    352    353    354    355    356    357    358    359    360    361    362    363    364    365    366    367    368    369    370    371    372    373    374    375    376    377    378    379    380    381    382    383    384    385    386    387    388    389    390    391    392    393    394    395    396    397    398    399    400    401    402    403    404    405    406    407    408    409    410    411    412    413    414    415    416    417    418    419    420    421    422    423    424    425    426    427    428    429    430    431    432    433    434    435    436    437    438    439    440    441    442    443    444    445    446    447    448    449    450    451    452    453    454    455    456    457    458    459    460    461    462    463    464    465    466    467    468    469    470    471

Comprehension 1

 

Sponsored Links

 

 
 
American Slang
English Proverbs
English Exercises
Common English mistakes
Ancient Chinese stories
Junior English essays
High school English essays
Lower Secondary English essays