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It's Like Déjà vu

You are walking through a park you have never visited before when a dog runs past, barking at a cluster of birds. You turn to see its owner smile and wave. Suddenly, you are overcome by the feeling that you have been here before—in this same park, with the same dog and birds, while the same owner is waving his arm in exactly the same way. By the time he lowers his arm, you realize the situation no longer fits quite so well with your fading recollection. You are sure once again that you have never been to this park. The familiarity is gone.

Déjà vu, French for "already seen," describes the peculiar feeling of having encountered an identical situation in the past, without knowing exactly when or where. The memory is most often attributed to a dream. The feeling lasts only a few seconds and is usually tied to an ordinary event. It may be a visual scene recalled in detail, or an uncanny knowledge of a new place. What is distinctive about déjà vu is not the situation itself but the feeling that accompanies it.

More than 70 percent of the population has experienced this phenomenon. Attempts to explain it range from past lives to repressed memories. Some people believe déjà vu is a form of precognition, the mysterious ability to know of an event before it happens. Scientists have linked déjà vu to neural disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy, suggesting it could be a hiccup of the brain with no connection to the past.

Is déjà vu ordinary or extraordinary? The answer remains a mystery. But perhaps you've heard this all before...

     
  1.

Which of the following wouldn't be considered déjà vu?

       
    (A)

An overwhelming urge to do the same thing over and over again.

    (B) The feeling that you've been somewhere before.
    (C) An impression that you've already met someone at one time or another.
    (D) A sensation that you've had the same experience in the past.
       
  2. How do scientists attempt to explain déjà vu?
       
    (A) It's a sign of potential cancer.
    (B)

It can indicate a harmless problem in the brain.

    (C) It means that a person has gone totally crazy.
    (D) It results from brain damage or other injuries.
       
  3. The last line of the article is trying to suggest _____.
       
    (A) this article was never published before
    (B) you'll never fully understand déjà vu
    (C)

you've read this article at a time in the past

    (D) you can never make up for your past mistakes
       
      deja vu   The illusion of having already experienced something actually being experienced for the first time.
           
      uncanny   strange or mysterious; difficult or impossible to explain
           
      precognition   knowledge of a future event, especially when it is obtained by a direct message to the mind, such as in a dream, rather than by reason
           
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  Answers : 1) A    2) B    3) C
 
 
 
 
 

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